Does Gold Plated Brass Tarnish?(Quick Expert Answer)

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Does gold plated brass tarnish? Why? Gold plating is a gift of science; you get to purchase gold, but for a fraction of the price. It allows people to own a bit of gold even when the pockets are tight.

In essence, what one is paying for is the base metal, in this case, brass, and the thin layer of gold added. Brass is cheap, but with gold plating, it tends to fetch a higher price.

While this all sounds ideal, there’s the reality of tarnishing, which is what a lot of metals experience.

Pure gold doesn’t tarnish, but the same is not true when it comes to jewelry making. The gold use is alloyed, meaning that there’s a chance of it tarnishing. What about when it comes to plating? Let’s explore that below.

 

Does gold plated brass tarnish? Why?

does gold plated brass tarnish

When you see the word “plated” next to any jewelry description, then that’s a guarantee that the item will tarnish.

Gold plated brass is essentially brass, the base metal, which has a thin coating of real gold of varying karats.

While gold is mostly tarnish-resistant, hence used for plating, the same cannot be said for the base metal.

 

There are multiple reasons for tarnishing.

Brass is a combination of copper and zinc, and when both are exposed to moisture and other chemicals, they discolor.

Therefore, while the gold is meant to keep the process at bay, that’s not what always happens. The other reason for the tarnishing is that over time, the top gold layer will fade. When exposed to various elements, especially abrasive ones, the gold will chip off and fade.

Gold plated jewelry, brass included, tend to only last for about two years, and that’s with good care.

That includes removing your brass jewelry when doing activities that include water of any nature, moisture, and chemicals. After the time lapses, it’s typical for people to take the piece to a jeweler for replating.

That’s good news since you don’t have to retire your jewelry once the brass layer is exposed.

 

Does 14k gold plated brass tarnish?

does gold plated brass tarnish

Gold plating is convenient because it allows one to have gold but for a fraction of the price. 14k gold consists of 58.3 percent gold, with the remaining percentage of metals including silver, zinc, copper, and nickel.

This karat gold is affordable, and that’s why people like it. It is equally strong and, thus, wear-resistant. Even with these qualities, your 14k gold plated brass jewelry will tarnish.

It won’t happen overnight give how durable the top layer is, but the jewelry will eventually tarnish

 

Does 18k gold plated brass tarnish?

The higher a gold karat is, the softer it tends to be. Thus, 14k gold is more durable than 18k gold, but that’s not to say it’s problematic.

The benchmark here is 24k gold. 18k gold is made up of 75 percent gold, and thus any plated jewelry will fetch a higher price.

Even so, you’ll experience scratches and some tarnishing over time as the brass reacts with the elements it comes into contact with.

Until then, you get to enjoy deep yellow jewelry that’s attractive and that most people won’t know that your jewelry is plated.

does gold plated brass tarnish

Does 24k gold plated brass tarnish?

You won’t find 24k gold plated anything anywhere on the planet. For one, 24k gold is too soft and thus not used in mainstream jewelry making.

This kind of gold plating will easily scratch off and fade in a matter of days of wearing the item.

Brass is relatively cheap, and plating it with 24k gold is a waste of money and the gold itself. If you find such a description on any store, then know that the seller is fraudulent.

Even if the jeweler is legitimate, you’re better off opting out of the plated brass and getting gold of a lower karat for the same price.

does gold plated brass tarnish

Does rose gold plated brass tarnish?

Rose gold is a beautiful color and has gained quite a liking among women because of its pink hue.

Having rose gold plated brass is a steal, given how cheap it is compared to actual rose gold jewelry.

If you want to keep the jewelry with you for a long time, then you’re required to give them special care.

Otherwise, the brass-plated piece will tarnish within the given time, and it’s time to get back to the jewelry.

 

Conclusion

Gold plating has made jewelry with gold more accessible to people. It allows them to have something with gold while only spending a fraction of what the real thing is worth.

While it’s a fantastic alternative to real gold, the unfortunate part is that you don’t get to enjoy the properties of actual gold.

Brass, and any other base metal used in plating, will eventually tarnish.

It’s worth keeping in mind because, after about two years, you’ll have to consider replating the jewelry.

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